Zogenix is a pharmaceutical company that was founded in 2006 and is committed to providing innovative treatments for people living with rare and burdensome diseases that affect the central nervous system, such as Dravet syndrome – Zogenix is working with dedicated scientific and medical experts, each of whom share a collective passion for making a difference in the lives of patients they serve.

Visit the Zogenix website to learn more.

Would you like to be kept up-to-date with the latest news about Zogenix’s efforts to treat Dravet syndrome?

Simply complete this form and we’ll send you information as and when it becomes available.

*Mandatory

Thank you for your interest in the FAiRE program of clinical studies, your details have been successfully submitted.

Thank you for your interest in the FAiRE program of clinical studies. To receive further information about the program, simply complete this form and our study team will contact you shortly.

Contact preference:

*Mandatory

Thank you for your interest in the FAiRE program of clinical studies, your details have been successfully submitted.

ABOUT DRAVET SYNDROME

Dravet syndrome (sometimes called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy or SMEI) is a debilitating form of epilepsy that begins in infancy. The condition is very rare, affecting only 1 in every 20,000-40,000 births and can result in:

  • Seizures
  • Behavioral and developmental problems
  • Movement and balance issues
  • Language and speech problems
  • Growth issues
  • Sleeping difficulties
  • Frequent infections
  • Nervous system problems

Certain anti-seizure medications have helped some children and young adults reduce the number of seizures they have. But they don’t work for everyone. That’s why studies (like those in the FAiRE program) are so important.

ABOUT CLINICAL RESEARCH

Clinical studies (also known as ‘clinical trials’) help researchers test new medications and improve (or test new uses for) those that are already available. They do this by asking participants to follow strict dosing plans and then comparing the results.

In this way, researchers can answer questions such as:

  • Does this investigational drug work?
  • Does it work better than another medicine already available?
  • Does it cause any side effects?

These dosing plans and questions are laid out in the study’s ‘protocol’. A large group of people (including doctors, researchers and other specialists) review this protocol before the study begins. It is their job to protect the safety of participants. But the exact risks of a study can be hard to predict. So participants must agree to a schedule of clinic visits and/or telephone appointments so that the study team can monitor their health and learn how their dosing plan is affecting them.